Eating + Cooking

Paper

May 7, 2012 @ 11:30, Room: 18CD

Chair: Wendy Ju, California College of the Arts, USA
Health Promotion as Activism: Building Community Capacity to Effect Social Change - Paper
Contribution & Benefit: Presents the design and evaluation of a tool that supports community-based health advocacy. Provides recommendations for HCI research focused on health inequalities and the ecological influences on behaviors and attitudes.
Abstract » As HCI researchers have designed tools to promote wellness, disease has often been approached as a general problem. In contrast, public health research argues for an activist approach focused on how certain groups disproportionately experience disease and eliminating these disparities. Taking this activist stance, we examine how technology can reduce health inequalities by disrupting power relationships and helping communities pursue social change. We discuss our tool, Community Mosaic (CM), which allows individuals to share their healthy eating ideas with one another as a means of advocating behavior change. Our results characterize how CM helped facilitate activism (i.e., collective efforts to counter local challenges to healthy living) and shift users� attitudes regarding their role as advocates for health. We contribute to the field of HCI by using our findings to present a set of recommendations for future research focused on designing and evaluating health promotion tools using an activist lens.
ACM
Augmented Perception of Satiety: Controlling Food Consumption by Changing Apparent Size of Food with Augmented Reality - Paper
Community: designCommunity: engineering
Contribution & Benefit: The main contribution of this paper is to realize a method for modifying perception of satiety and controlling nutritional intake by changing the apparent size of food with augmented reality.
Abstract » The main contribution of this paper is to realize a method for modifying perception of satiety and controlling nutritional intake by changing the apparent size of food with augmented reality. As a possible method for decreasing rates of obesity, we focused on controlling food intake implicitly without any effort.
We hypothesized that ambiguous perception of satiety can be applied to control our food intake. Recent psychological studies have revealed that the amount of food consumed is influenced by both its actual volume and external factors during eating. Based on this knowledge, we sought to control perception of satiety gained from the same amount of food by changing its apparent size. We also proposed a method for food-volume augmentation using real-time shape deformation. Our results suggest that this augmentation can control the perception of satiety and food intake.
ACM
Laying the Table for HCI: Uncovering Ecologies of Domestic Food Consumption - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Study of family eating practices in the home and the artefacts and spaces involved. Provides a set of sensitizing concepts for interaction designers and technologists seeking to augment domestic eating.
Abstract » Food contributes fundamentally to our well-being: physically, mentally, and socially. Unsurprisingly then, the importance of food to our lives has long been recognized in the social sciences, and more recently, in Human-Computer Interaction. Yet, despite ongoing trends towards the digital augmentation of domestic environments, little consideration has been given to the impact of the material aspects of food consumption in the home. This paper takes an ecological approach to uncovering the role spaces, tabletops, and artefacts play in the social organization of domestic eating practices. Based on our findings of interviews with seven households in England, we discuss implications for those seeking to digitally augment domestic dining.
ACM
panavi: Recipe Medium with a Sensors-Embedded Pan for Domestic Users to Master Professional Culinary Arts - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: "panavi,'' a recipe medium utilizing a sensors-embedded frying pan, supports cooking experience for domestic users to master professional culinary arts by managing temperature and pan movement properly.
Abstract » "panavi," a recipe medium, supports cooking experience for domestic users to master professional culinary arts in their kitchens by managing temperature and pan movement properly. Utilizing a sensors-embedded fry-ing pan—providing projected images, LED indications, and vibration—wirelessly connected with a computer system that shows text messages with sounds, the panavi system analyzes sensors' data, recognizes users' conditions, and provides the users with situated instructions. Describing our vision, design process, implementation, and user study that outlines experience of challenging professional cooking, this paper introduces a design framework model of this recipe medium for domestic usage. Throughout revealing the design process—from ideation to the finished research artifact as a whole cook-ing support system—this research suggests how to design interactive systems responding to human situated actions, for use as daily commodities enriching domestic user experience.
ACM