Health and Children

Paper

May 10, 2012 @ 09:30, Room: 18CD

Chair: Julie Kientz, University of Washington, USA
MOSOCO: A Mobile Assistive Tool to Support Children with Autism Practicing Social Skills in Real-Life Situations - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Usability and usefulness study of socially assistive technologies outside classrooms. A mobile assistive tool that could be useful in designing and evaluating mobile assistive technologies for use in real-life situations.
Abstract » MOSOCO is a mobile assistive application that uses augmented reality and the visual supports of a validated curriculum, the Social Compass, to help children with autism practice social skills in real-life situations. In this paper, we present the results of a seven-week deployment study of MOSOCO in a public school in Southern California with both students with autism and neurotypical students. The results of our study demonstrate that MOSOCO facilitates practicing and learning social skills, increases both quantity and quality of social interactions, reduces social and behavioral missteps, and enables the integration of children with autism in social groups of neurotypical children. The findings from this study reveal emergent practices of the uses of mobile assistive technologies in real-life situations.
ACM
Developing IDEAS: Supporting Children with Autism within a Participatory Design Team - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Describes IDEAS, a design method for involving children with autism in the technology design process. Provides structured support for difficulties contributing to the design process within a collaborative design team.
Abstract » IDEAS (Interface Design Experience for the Autistic Spectrum) is a method for involving children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in the technology design process. This paper extends the IDEAS method to enable use with a design team, providing specific added support for communication and collaboration difficulties that may arise. A study to trial this extended method was conducted with two design teams, each involving three children with ASD, in a series of six, weekly design sessions focused on designing a math game. The findings from this study reveal that the children were able to successfully participate in the sessions and collaborate with other children. The findings also highlight the positive experience that involvement in such a process can offer this population.
ACM
Supporting Face-To-Face Communication Between Clinicians and Children with Chronic Headaches Through a Zoomable Multi-Touch App - Paper
Contribution & Benefit: Provides evidence that zoomable multitouch app helps children with chronic headaches communicate more detailed descriptions of pain than paper-based alternatives.
Abstract » Chronic headaches are one of the top five health problems for young children in the United States, negatively affecting their quality of life and learning opportunities. A clear understanding of children�s headache characteristics is crucial for delivering appropriate treatment. However, current data collection methods were designed for adults often resulting in insufficient information. In this paper we present a novel method to help children communicate with health care providers and researchers about their headaches. It augments an existing child-centric method called Draw-and-Tell Conversation, which has already been shown to provide more actionable information from children than standard data collection methods. It does so by enabling children to draw their symptoms on a zoomable drawing application, giving them the ability to provide more details and context than on paper. We present a study conducted with nineteen children aged 7 to 12 suggesting that children provided more information about their headaches when using the zoomable drawing application than when drawing on paper. This study provides a rare example of a mobile device used to enhance face-to-face interactions and contributes evidence of a specific benefit of zoomable user interfaces.
ACM
Design of an Exergaming Station for Children with Cerebral Palsy - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Describes the design of an exergaming station for children with cerebral palsy. Results present the design challenges of the station and suggest several lessons for game designers.
Abstract » We report on the design of a novel station supporting the play of exercise video games (exergames) by children with cerebral palsy (CP). The station combines a physical platform allowing children with CP to provide pedaling input into a game, a standard Xbox 360 controller, and algorithms for interpreting the cycling input to improve smoothness and accuracy of gameplay. The station was designed through an iterative and incremental participatory design process involving medical professionals, game designers, computer scientists, kinesiologists, physical therapists, and eight children with CP. It has been tested through observation of its use, through gathering opinions from the children, and through small experimental studies. With our initial design, only three of eight children were capable of playing a cycling-based game; with the final design, seven of eight could cycle effectively, and six reached energy expenditure levels recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine while pedaling unassisted.
ACM