Movement-Based Gameplay

Case Study & Paper

May 9, 2012 @ 11:30, Room: 18CD

Chair: Shaun Kane, University of Maryland Baltimore County, USA
Balancing Exertion Experiences - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Presents guidelines from "Jogging over a Distance", a mobile system used by jogging partners with different fitness levels between Europe and Australia. Aids designers of exertion games and sports apps.
Abstract » Exercising with others, such as jogging in pairs, can be socially engaging. However, if exercise partners have different fitness levels then the activity can be too strenuous for one and not challenging enough for the other, compromising engagement and health benefits. Our system, Jogging over a Distance, uses heart rate data and spatialized sound to create an equitable, balanced experience between joggers of different fitness levels who are geographically distributed. We extend this prior work by analyzing the experience of 32 joggers to detail how specific design features facilitated, and hindered, an engaging and balanced exertion experience. With this knowledge, we derive four dimensions that describe a design space for balancing exertion experiences: Measurement, Adjustment, Presentation and Control. We also present six design tactics for creating balanced exertion experiences described by these dimensions. By aiding designers in supporting participants of different physical abilities, we hope to increase participation and engagement with physical activity and facilitate the many benefits it brings about.
ACM
The Acute Cognitive Benefits of Casual Exergame Play - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: We designed a casual exergame, which when played for 10min yields exertion levels comparable to treadmill exercise and produces measurable cognitive improvements (concentration) over a sedentary version of the game.
Abstract » Acute cognitive benefits, such as temporary improvements in concentration, can result from as few as ten minutes of exercise; however, most people do not take exercise breaks throughout the day. To motivate people to receive the cognitive benefits of exercising in short bursts multiple times per day, we designed an engaging casual exergame. To determine whether there are cognitive benefits after playing our game, we conducted two studies to compare playing ten minutes of our casual exergame to a sedentary version of the game or exercise on a treadmill. We found acute cognitive benefits of the casual exergame over the sedentary version (but not treadmill exercise), demonstrated by significantly improved performance on two cognitive tests that require focus and concentration. Significant improvements were also found in participants� affective states after playing the casual exergame. Finally, our casual exergame produces similar exertion levels to treadmill exercise, but is perceived as more fun.
ACM
Full-Body Motion-Based Game Interaction for Older Adults - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Case study describing the design of full-body motion-based games for older adults. Provides guidelines to inform work of designers and support the creation of accessible interaction paradigms for older adults.
Abstract » Older adults in nursing homes often lead sedentary lifestyles, which reduces their life expectancy. Full-body motion-control games provide an opportunity for these adults to remain active and engaged; these games are not designed with age-related impairments in mind, which prevents the games from being leveraged to increase the activity levels of older adults. In this paper, we present two studies aimed at developing game design guidelines for full-body motion controls for older adults experiencing age-related changes and impairments. Our studies also demonstrate how full-body motion-control games can accommodate a variety of user abilities, have a positive effect on mood and, by extension, the emotional well-being of older adults. Based on our studies, we present seven guidelines for the design of full-body interaction in games. The guidelines are designed to foster safe physical activity among older adults, thereby increasing their quality of life.
ACM
Wii as Entertainment and Socialisation Aids for Mental and Social Health of the Elderly - Long Case Study
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: This study examines and discusses the effects of the Nintendo Wii games, examples of co-located games, as entertainment and socialization aids between the elderly and the youths.
Abstract » As the world population ages rapidly, it is likely that more elderly risks being detached from society. The possible isolation of many more elderly could lead to societal and mental health problems that could weigh down on public healthcare systems. Using surveys, focus groups, interviews and video analysis, our pilot study examines the effects of the Nintendo Wii games, examples of co-located games, between two generations (old and young), and the factors that could affect the adoption and enjoyment of computer-mediated games as entertainment and socialization aids between the elderly and the youths. This pilot study with 14 pairs of elderly-teenager participants shows that general attitude towards the other age group improves after a period of playing. The paper concludes with a discussion on design recommendations for computer-mediated games in general that can support inter-generational gameplay between the elderly and the youths, and as entertainment and socialisation aids to promote positive mental and social health of the elderly.