Teaching with Games

Paper

May 9, 2012 @ 14:30, Room: 18AB

Chair: Andreas Butz, University of Munich, Germany
Reducing Compensatory Motions in Video Games for Stroke Rehabilitation - Paper
Community: user experience
Contribution & Benefit: Series of studies about creating video games that use operant conditioning to correct therapeutic exercises for stroke rehabilitation. Can assist video game designers in modifying unconscious behavior through games.
Abstract » Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability among adults in industrialized nations; approximately 80% of people who survive a stroke experience motor disabilities. Recovery requires hundreds of daily repetitions of therapeutic exercises, often without therapist supervision. When performing therapy alone, people with limited motion often compensate for the lack of motion in one joint by moving another one. This compensation can impede the recovery progress and create new health problems. In this work we contribute (1) a methodology to reliably sense compensatory torso motion in the context of shoulder exercises done by persons with stroke and (2) the design and experimental evaluation of operant-conditioning-based strategies for games that aim to reduce compensatory torso motion. Our results show that these strategies significantly reduce compensatory motions compared to alternatives.
ACM
Of BATs and APEs: An Interactive Tabletop Game for Natural History Museums - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Describes user experiences with a tabletop game on evolution at a natural history museum. Can help designers approach evaluation of interactive surfaces in museums. Presents qualitative results on visitor engagement.
Abstract » In this paper we describe visitor interaction with an interactive tabletop exhibit on evolution that we designed for use in natural history museums. We video recorded 30 families using the exhibit at the Harvard Museum of Natural History. We also observed an additional 50 social groups interacting with the exhibit without video recording. The goal of this research is to explore ways to develop "successful" interactive tabletop exhibits for museums. To determine criteria for success in this context, we borrow the concept of Active Prolonged Engagement (APE) from the science museum literature. Research on APE sets a high standard for visitor engagement and learning, and it offers a number of useful concepts and measures for research on interactive surfaces in the wild. In this paper we adapt and expand on these measures and apply them to our tabletop exhibit. Our results show that visitor groups collaborated effectively and engaged in focused, on-topic discussion for prolonged periods of time. To understand these results, we analyze visitor conversation at the exhibit. Our analysis suggests that social practices of game play contributed substantially to visitor collaboration and engagement with the exhibit.
ACM
Playable Character: Extending Digital Games into the Real World - Paper
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: This paper describes a series of research probe games developed to investigate how real-world activity could be incorporated into digital game systems.
Abstract » This paper describes a series of research probe games developed to investigate how real-world activity could be incorporated into digital game systems. These culminated in the design of our final game, Forest, which was conceived for the San Francisco non-profit Friends of the Urban Forest (FUF), who have been planting and caring for the city's street trees for 30 years. By incorporating real-world actions and behaviors into digital games, we can create experiences that both enhance our understanding of the world around us and provide incentive structures towards our personal, community, or societal goals.
ACM
Game Design for Promoting Counterfactual Thinking - Note
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Presents a formative typology of counterfactual design patterns that can help designers, educators, and players locate interesting fault lines in reality that facilitate the expansion of ARG mythologies.
Abstract » We describe the first iteration of an Alternate Reality Game (ARG) designed to lead players into a newly enfranchised relationship with history and engage them in scientific thinking and information literacy practices. We found that the points at which the game's mythology blurred the lines between fact and fiction prompted middle school students to move beyond rote memorization of content. Instead, they began to question, analyze, and make hypotheses about the data presented. However, striking a meaningful balance between "true" history and imagined events poses new design challenges. We present a formative typology of counterfactual design patterns that can help designers, educators, and players locate interesting fault lines in reality that facilitate the expansion of ARG mythologies.
ACM
Discovery-based Games for Learning Software - Note
Community: design
Contribution & Benefit: Describes a discovery-based learning game that teaches people how to use complex software such as Adobe Photoshop using the Jigsaw metaphor. Can scaffold and motivate learning new tools and techniques.
Abstract » We propose using discovery-based learning games to teach people how to use complex software. Specifically, we developed Jigsaw, a learning game that asks players to solve virtual jigsaw puzzles using tools in Adobe Photoshop. We conducted an eleven-person lab study of the prototype, and found the game to be an effective learning medium that can complement demonstration-based tutorials. Not only did the participants learn about new tools and techniques while actively solving the puzzles in Jigsaw, but they also recalled techniques that they had learned previously but had forgotten.
ACM